Glen Coe

Being in this Glen is just incredible. There’s no other words to describe it. I love standing at the bottom, looking up and feeling so small. 

 

It’s an important area in Scotland’s history and one of the most well known Glens. 

 

As you come up out of the Bridge of Orchy (ensuring you stop at the Loch Tulla viewpoint on the way) it’s like entering a different planet. The vast, boggy landscape of Rannoch Moor goes on as far as the eye can see. Soon you reach the Glencoe Mountain Resort, popular with skiers in the winter.

Then...well then you become surrounded by mountains, starting with Buachaille Etive Mor (The Herdsman) on the left and the Aonach Eagach Ridge guiding you up to the village of Glencoe, and the Pap of Glencoe (Sgorr an Chiche) 

 

I think you can tell we love it there! I loved it so much I did the Great Glencoe Challenge in July 2017, which is a 26.2 mile trek through the pass of Glencoe and up to Fort William. I’ve mixed feelings about whether I loved that part - my head says “yeah it was great, lets do it again!” My hips and toes say “are you kidding me, do you hate us?”

 

Back to the history of the Glen. Many people might be aware of the Glencoe Massacre, which took place in 1692 and was part of the long running clan feud between the MacDonalds and the Campbells. On that morning, 38 men, women, and children had been slaughtered and lay in the snow. This murderous event was the beginning of the end for the trust between the Highland clans.

 

This bloody event in Scotland’s history was apparently George R.R. Martin’s inspiration for the “Red Wedding” in Game of Thrones. You know - that brutal episode where (spoiler alert) half the characters were killed off.

 

If you love your outdoor sports then this is a mecca for it with skiing, kayaking, canoeing, hiking, and cycling on offer.

 

On your next trip to Glencoe - don’t just drive through.  Get out the car and take a minute to reflect on how ancient this land is and what it means to our beautiful country.